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06-19 - MESA Challenge AP Statistics

(5 Questions)
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MESA challenge set for AP Statistics
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You’ve likely had to determine the likelihood of simple events occurring, also known as probability. The following problems take it a step further and combine these ideas with combinatorics, a fancy way to describe the different potential arrangements of objects. Remember that the probability of an event occurring is the number of ways we can complete the event divided by the total number of events that could happen.
You flip a fair coin three times. What is the probability of it landing heads up all three times? You may need to write out all possible scenarios to determine the total number of events. Enter answer as a fraction (x/y).
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You’ve likely had to determine the likelihood of simple events occurring, also known as probability. The following problems take it a step further and combine these ideas with combinatorics, a fancy way to describe the different potential arrangements of objects. Remember that the probability of an event occurring is the number of ways we can complete the event divided by the total number of events that could happen.
You flip the same coin three times. Now find the probability of it landing heads up on AT THE MOST two of the times. Enter answer as a fraction (x/y).
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You’ve likely had to determine the likelihood of simple events occurring, also known as probability. The following problems take it a step further and combine these ideas with combinatorics, a fancy way to describe the different potential arrangements of objects. Remember that the probability of an event occurring is the number of ways we can complete the event divided by the total number of events that could happen.
You flip the same coin three times. What is the probability of it landing heads up on AT LEAST two of the times? Enter answer as a simplified fraction (x/y).
0
1
You’ve likely had to determine the likelihood of simple events occurring, also known as probability. The following problems take it a step further and combine these ideas with combinatorics, a fancy way to describe the different potential arrangements of objects. Remember that the probability of an event occurring is the number of ways we can complete the event divided by the total number of events that could happen.
You toss two fair coins, coin A ten seconds after coin B. What is the probability of coin A landing heads up. Enter answer as a decimal (no leading 0).
0
1
You’ve likely had to determine the likelihood of simple events occurring, also known as probability. The following problems take it a step further and combine these ideas with combinatorics, a fancy way to describe the different potential arrangements of objects. Remember that the probability of an event occurring is the number of ways we can complete the event divided by the total number of events that could happen.
Now let’s say we have a biased coin which has a ⅔ probability of landing on its tail. We flip this coin six times. What is the probability (to the nearest tenth and no leading 0) of us getting at least 1 head.
by Frank T