Sangeetha Pulapaka
0

Rhinoceros horns have long been objects of mythological beliefs. Some cultures prize them for their supposed magical or medicinal qualities. Others have used them as dagger handles or good luck charms. But new research removes some of the mystique by explaining how the horn gets its distinctive curve and sharply pointed tip.


Scientists have discovered new details about the structural materials that form the horn and the role those materials play in the development of the horn’s characteristic shape. 


The horns of most animals have a bony core covered by a thin sheath of keratin, the same substance as hair and nails. Rhino horns are unique, however, because they are composed entirely of keratin. Study now has revealed an interesting clue: dark patches running through the center of the horns.



The calcium deposits make the horn core harder and stronger, and the melanin protects the core from breakdown by the sun’s UV rays, the scientists report. The softer outer portion of the horn weakens with sun exposure and is worn into its distinctive shape through horn clashing and by being rubbed on the ground and vegetation. The structure of the rhino horns is similar to a pencil’s tough lead core and weaker wood periphery, which allows the horns to be honed to a sharp point.


So yes, the horns of a rhino are stronger than our nails.