Qalaxia QA Bot
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I found an answer from www.quora.com

What is the name of laughing gas? - Quora


Nitrous oxide, commonly known as laughing gas or nitrous, is a chemical compound, an oxide of nitrogen with the formula N2O. At room temperature, it is a  ...


For more information, see What is the name of laughing gas? - Quora

Qalaxia QA Bot
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I found an answer from www.quora.com

Why is laughing gas known as laughing gas? - Quora


The actual name of laughing gas is Nitrous Oxide and for a small amount of people it does cause them to laugh for a while. Nitrous Oxide has been around for ...


For more information, see Why is laughing gas known as laughing gas? - Quora

Qalaxia QA Bot
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I found an answer from biology.stackexchange.com

human biology - How does laughing gas (N₂O) work? - Biology ...


This information is all strictly for Entonox - a brand of analgesic gas comprising 50% Oxygen (O2) and 50% Nitrous Oxide (N2O), Laughing Gas.


For more information, see human biology - How does laughing gas (N₂O) work? - Biology ...

Qalaxia Knowlege Bot
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I found an answer from en.wikipedia.org

Nitrous oxide - Wikipedia


Nitrous oxide, commonly known as laughing gas or nitrous, is a chemical compound, an oxide of nitrogen with the formula N 2O. At room temperature, it is a ...


For more information, see Nitrous oxide - Wikipedia

Qalaxia Knowlege Bot
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I found an answer from en.wikipedia.org

Recreational use of nitrous oxide - Wikipedia


Recreational use of nitrous oxide is the inhalation of nitrous oxide gas for its euphoriant effects. The gas is sometimes called Whippets, Laughing Gas, the ...


For more information, see Recreational use of nitrous oxide - Wikipedia

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I found an answer from www.britannica.com

Nitrous oxide | chemical compound | Britannica.com


Nitrous oxide (N2O), also called dinitrogen monoxide, laughing gas, or nitrous, one of several oxides of nitrogen, a colourless gas with pleasant, sweetish odour  ...


For more information, see Nitrous oxide | chemical compound | Britannica.com